Governor’s Message

Toward the Next Stage of ACP Japan Chapter

Fumiaki Ueno, MD, MACP, MACG, AGAF

Governor for ACP Japan Chapter

I am delighted to announce that Dr. Kenji Maeda assumed the Governor-elect for ACP Japan Chapter as of 21 April 2018, at the ending of ACP Internal Medicine Meeting in New Orleans.  He will assume the Governor for our Chapter in April 2019.  Dr. Maeda is one of the founding members of the ACP Japan Chapter, and has served as the officer for the Chapter for years.  His contribution to the Chapter has been tremendous.  Although he is a busy practicing physician, he attends ACP IMM every year, and organizes valuable social functions for attendees from Japan and guests from national office.  Current good relationships between the ACP headquarter and our Chapter would be impossible without his effort.

The Japan Chapter was established in 2003, as the first ACP Chapter away from American Continent.  Led by Dr. Kiyoshi Kurokawa, the founding Governor, the Chapter developed steadily during his term for eight years.  Dr. Shotai Kobayashi succeeded as the next Governor, and the Chapter grew further.  The most significant event of the Chapter is the Annual Chapter Meeting, and this has been true learning opportunity to obtain updated knowledge and skills in internal medicine worldwide.  We attracted many brilliant physicians, trainees and medical students, and our membership is continuously growing, not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively.

My term as the Governor will end in April 2019.  With the support of enthusiastic advisory councils, Dr. Maeda will take a good leadership for the Chapter for the next four years.  I just cannot wait for the next stage of the ACP Japan Chapter.

 

 

from International Exchange Program Committee

International Exchange Program Committee

1. What we Accomplished

a. Clinical observership at Olive View Medical Center, University of California, Los Angeles was initiated in 2012, and ended as of August 2017. Since 2012 until the end of the program, there had been a total of sixteen observers through this program.

b. Drs. Masayuki Nogi and Jinichi Tokeshi, and other supportive local physicians at Department of Medicine, University of Hawaii kindly offered clinical observership for our two members in November 2017 and February 2018, respectively.

c. The committee has created evaluation criteria (evaluation sheet) for the candidates’ CVs and personal statement.

d. Mentorship has been introduced for each observer before, during, and after the observership.

e. An Email list serve for the alumni members of this program, committee members, and the ACP council members has been launched for a weekly report from the Olive View Medical Center by observers.

 

2. What We Were Already Working On

a. Revision of credential evaluation/support for the candidates

 

3. What We Initiated

a. More strategic recruitment for the candidates of the observership.

b. New members who are still early in their career (such as Drs. Yuji Yamada, Emily Muranaka) joined this committee to support the members to obtain international medical experiences.

c. After the obsevership at Olive View Medical Center, University of California, Los Angeles ended, our committee tried to find any new programs for clinical observership and Dr. Takahiko Tsutsumi significantly has contributed to explore and support the clinical observership program at University of Hawaii.

d. The committee will organize a seminar to help early career physicians understand clinical and research experiences they could have in international settings for physicians in early career at the annual meeting of ACP Japan Chapter in June 2018.

 

Seminar Notice

International Exchange Program Committee

ACP Japan Chapter Annual Meeting

Luncheon seminar

Time: 11:40-12:40, Saturday, June 2, 2018

“Why not pursue a global career path?”

Held by International Exchange Program Committee

New member of Public Relations Committee

Public Relations Committee has new members.

Public Relations Committee
member

Hanae Shimura MD, PhD

Institution
 
International University of Health and Welfare
Department/Division
 
School of Health Sciences, Department of Medical Technology and Sciences
Job Title
 
Associate Professor
Message
 
In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.
Public Relations Committee
member

Yoshitsugu Obi MD, PhD, FASN

Institution
 
University of California Irvine
Department/Division
 
Division of Nephrology & Hypertension
Job Title
 
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Public Relations Committee
member

Masahiko Maeda MD, PhD, FACP

Institution
 
MAEDA CLINIC
Job Title
 
President
Message
 
From Islandcity to the world
Public Relations Committee
member

Yohei Kanzawa MD

Institution
 
Akashi Medical Center
Department/Division
 
General Internal Medicine
Job Title
 
Staff
Message
 
Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance but to do what lies clearly at hand. By William Osler
Public Relations Committee
member

Takamasa Miyauchi MD

Institution
 
St luke's international hospital
Department/Division
 
nephrology
Job Title
 
staff
Message
 
I want to make each encounter precious.

Student Committee

I would like to introduce Student Committee members

(PRC chair, Dr. Oshima)

 

Student Committee
Chairperson

Natsumi Momoki

Institution
 
Kanazawa Univesity
Job Title
 
student
Message
 
to feel brave, act as if we were brave
Student Committee
Vice chairperson

Shungo Oka

Institution
 
Nara medical university
Department/Division
 
faculty of medicine
Job Title
 
5th-year student
Message
 
One life, one chance.
Student Committee

Fumie Osuga

Institution
 
University of Occupational and Environmental Health
Department/Division
 
faculty of medicine
Job Title
 
5th grade
Message
 
Where there's a will, there's a way.
Student Committee

Rika Terashima

Institution
 
Gunma University
Department/Division
 
School of Medicine
Job Title
 
3rd year student
Message
 
I am very excited to work with everyone in the student committee and I look forward to learning from the physicians presenting at the 2018 ACP JC conference.
Student Committee

Mitsuki Kawabe

Institution
 
Kanazawa Medical University
Department/Division
 
faculty of medicine
Job Title
 
5th grade
Message
 
I want to learn about the American medicine. By comparing the differences in American and Japanese clinical medicine, I want to introduce the good points of U.S. medicine to Japanese medicine.
Student Committee

Tomohiro Hirai

Institution
 
Mie University
Department/Division
 
faculty of medicine
Job Title
 
student
Message
 
work with diligence and modest
Student Committee

Tsuyoshi Mandai

Institution
 
Nara medical university
Department/Division
 
faculty of medicine
Job Title
 
Fifth year medical student
Message
 
Being satisfied about the present, there will be no growth !!
Student Committee

Kotaro Yoshita

Institution
 
Kanazawa University
Department/Division
 
Department of medicine
Job Title
 
Student
Message
 
It doesn’t matter
Student Committee

Hitomi Miyake

Institution
 
Nara Medical University
Department/Division
 
facalty of medicine
Job Title
 
3rd grade
Message
 
Without haste ,but without rest.

Dr. Kitano was appointed vice chairperson of PRC

Dr. Kitano was appointed vice chairperson of Public Relations Committee (PRC)

When the fiscal year began in July 2017,  Dr.  Kitano, Yuka participated in PRC taking charge of the ‘in the clinic’ project. In order to become more active as a responsible in charge of ‘in the clinic’, she began to be a vice chairman from January 2018.  Thank you very much. The council of ACP Japan has approved it, and the web page of the activity policy of PRC and the description of the web page of the official committee introduction of the Japan Chapter have been  updated.

(PRC Chairperson Yasuo Oshima)

Report of International Exchange Program Participant – Dr. Fujisaki

ACP Japan Chapter IEP

Exchange period: 2017/10/31-2017/11/21

Through the ACP Japan Chapter International Exchange Program, I was privileged to observe Hospital Medicine and Family Medicine in Hawaii. I would like to thank Dr. Nogi, Dr. Tokeshi, and everyone else involved in the Program, for helping me to gain invaluable insight into the significant differences between the way health care systems are organized from country to country.

<Hospital Medicine>

I performed the observation of Hospital Medicine by shadowing a hospitalist Dr. Nogi at the Queen’s Medical Center (QMC) in Honolulu.

Firstly, I learned that Hawaii’s population is quite diverse. Almost 40% of the state’s 13.6 million residents have Asian roots, including 15% Japanese; a quarter of the population is White; Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders account for 10%; and finally, African Americans about 2 %. Of the above, 10% also count themselves Hispanic, and 25% overall identify as two or more races. In view of the Compact of Free Association between the United States and the three Pacific island nations: the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall islands, and Palau, as the biggest hospital in the region, QMC accepts a variety of transferred patients reflecting a diversity of race, creed, and other characteristics. In this way, severely ill patients in the vast area will converge at QMC, and hospitalists at QMC, together with numerous consultants, must deal with a wide range of diseases. For example, I witnessed a hospitalist consulting oncologists for a chemotherapy regimen, a palliative care team for management of side effects, infectious doctors for febrile neutropenia, and specialists in the main land about the Car-T therapy to treat a patient diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma. Throughout the observation, I also learned that hospitalists are required to show leadership like an orchestral conductor to convey harmonic medical care with many specialists. Especially because of Hawaii’s great diversity, the local hospitalist’s competency as a team leader required both familiarity with the medical resources in the hospital and the skill to operate as a communication hub for directing the best multidisciplinary care.

More broadly, I learned that the number of “hospitalists” in the United States has grown from a few hundred to more than 50,000 over the last decade?larger than any other subspecialty in internal medicine. I also learned that hospitalists bring reductions in hospital costs, lengths of admissions, and rates of readmission. It is for these reasons that approximately 75% of U.S. hospitals now hire hospitalists. Some specialists predict that the number of hospitalists will further increase, although this new type of specialty has its disadvantages, such as discontinuity of care from outpatient to inpatient care or medical field overlap with other specialists.

Meanwhile, the number of hospitalists in Japan is as few and far between as they were a decade ago in the United States. Because of Japan’s rapidly growing aging population, the myriad diseases and intense need for acute hospital care common to this group will require new strategies. I anticipate the number of Japanese hospitalists who play a leadership role in those settings may increase over the next decade, following the footsteps of the United States.

<Family Medicine>

I performed Family Medicine observation by shadowing Dr. Tokeshi who is a clinical professor of Family Medicine at John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaii. Dr. Tokeshi has been serving his male and female patients of all ages from the cradle to the grave for almost 40 years. As a matter of fact, he is the primary care physician for 5 generations of one family. Shadowing him was truly inspiring and I learned that the family doctors’ approach to health problems is through longitudinal continuity of the patient/doctor relationship?one seldom established in the relatively short-term clinical relationships within other specialties. Furthermore, personal life histories were meticulously taken. For example, I learned that Japanese descendants in Hawaii often have unique life histories influenced by migration or world war. Those factors proved indispensable in interpreting health problems in the physical, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual dimensions. These problem-solving strategies appeared to be core elements to a professional primary care physician’s repertoire in Hawaii.

From a wider perspective, family doctors are the first gates in primary care and have important roles as coordinators and advocates for the health of the community. When it comes to the health care system in the United States, I learned that it is difficult for ill or poor people to purchase insurance contracts and gain easy access to primary care. I understand that in 2010 the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”) was made to improve the situation, and as a result, the number of people who have insurance is expected to increase by 2020 and bring more fairness in primary care.

Japan, by contrast, offers medical insurance for the whole nation and people there have ease of access to medical care. On the other hand, Japan does not yet have qualified training programs for primary care physicians; and although the Japanese Medical Specialty Board has been preparing for establishing a new training system in each medical field by April 2018, there remains a shortage of family doctors. Consequently, Japanese patients are rarely seen by their officially trained primary care doctors, but are seen instead by providers whose specialty is on the boundaries of medical fields divided by anatomical and physiological systems.

With the number of Japanese elderly, multi-morbid patients skyrocketing, I imagine the number of Japanese trained as primary care physicians like the family doctors in Hawaii?who approach and can manage any health problems from holistic perspective, will increase, once global standard primary care training programs are established here in Japan, in the near future.

Tomohiro Fujisaki, MD 2018 January

Interim Report from Student Committee 2017

ACP Japan Chapter Student Committee

Interim Report

Date(December 19, 2017)
Committee(Student committee)
Chair(Natsumi Momoki)

1. What We Accomplished

a. Information meeting was held to promote for admission to ACP member at workshops for medical student.

2. What We Were Already Working On

a. Planning about workshop at next annual meeting.
b. Adding motivated person to student committee member

3. What We Plan To Initiate

a. a workshop held by student committee member for promotion is under discussion. Although the contents are not yet confirmed, it includes seminar about medical English or study abroad for medical students.