Doctor’s Dilemma in ACP Japan Chapter Annual Meeting 2018 (2)

 

Dr. Uchiyama and I joined Doctor’s dilemma on behalf of our hospital. Doctor’s dilemma is one of the most popular part of Japan chapter, which is held every year in Kyoto. Luckily, We could win the championship. This article will be a simple report of my experience. It would be my pleasure if you get a rough image of what ACP Dr’s dilemma is and get interested in it.
Doctor’s dilemma is so called medical knowledge competition. Residents from many hospitals join it in pairs. More and more teams are taking part in it every year. The winner will be given the chance to participate in Doctor’s dilemma held in USA.
Doctor’s dilemma is divided into two parts, Preliminary and Final. In the Preliminary, we used smartphones to answer the questions. The questions were not so difficult, which made us a little bit nervous as losing even one question would be deadly. Ten team passed the Preliminary, which included us.
The Final started after short break. We answered 25 question from 5 areas, GIM, ID, Collagen, Nephro and Hemo. The questions were very practical and connected directly to what we do every day. We finished 25 questions at the second place.
The final question was to diagnose the case. I felt a little bit awkward because I have never seen the disease. However, the case was so typical that we were able to give the right answer. The final question was special because we could bet points as we wanted. We bet all the points and got our score double. We succeeded in making comeback to win.
It was a good match. Many factors contributed to our win. One of the reasons I would like to emphasize is that we belong to Tokyo bay medical center. We bought MKSAP with help and we use it as a self assessment literally. Attending stuffs are also very educative and nice. They Kindly cheered for us on the day. I strongly recommend you come to our hospital.
Finally, I would like to thank everyone who helped holding the ACP Japan chapter. I expect Dr’s dilemma to be even more competitive next year.
Keisuke Takano
Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center

Doctor’s Dilemma in ACP Japan Chapter Annual Meeting 2018

 

I am honored to report that Dr. Takano and I won first prize in the American College of Physicians (ACP) Doctor’s Dilemma competition in Japan.

At first, my goal in joining the competition was simply to assess my skills as an internist. Since distinguished young doctors from all over Japan would be in the contest, I wanted to compare my abilities to theirs. However, with the support of my partner, Dr. Takano, I ended up winning the championship.

Several factors contributed to our victory. First, we prepared for the competition by working up many MKSAP questions to enhance our medical knowledge. Second, our teamwork might have been superior to that of other teams because Dr. Takano and I have been colleagues since we were junior residents. Above all, I believe that our success resulted from our day-to-day sincere attitude and strong passion for helping every patient we see in our hospital. Our success was cultivated in the excellent environment that the attending doctors in our hospital promote. The victory led me to conclude that our hospital is the ideal place to practice medicine and improve my skills as a physician.

I am quite excited about the chance to participate in the ACP Doctor’s Dilemma Final that will be held in Philadelphia in 2019. Since Japanese teams typically struggle in the tournament, our biggest goal is to win the first game. I have no doubt that we can do it. I look forward to it and will continue to brush up on my medical knowledge until then.

Finally, I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude to the attending doctors who gave us the chance to join the competition, the friends who congratulated us, and my family who support me unconditionally.

 

Shuhei Uchiyama

Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center

Greetings from Dr. Ende (Immediate Past-President of ACP)

Impressions of Japan ACP Chapter Meeting 2018

Jack Ende, MD, MACP, Immediate Past-President, ACP

 

I was honored early in June to present a plenary talk on Professionalism and the College Update for the ACP Japan Chapter Annual Meeting 2018.  The meeting was a great success.  The topics presented ranged broadly across the practice of internal medicine, medical education, professional development, and, even, physical diagnosis.  What left the greatest impression on me, however, was the theme of the meeting:  “Mind and Arts as Essentials for Internists:  Beyond Evidence and Technology.”

As Meeting Chair, Yugo Shibagaki, MD, FACP, so eloquently wrote in the program guide, “Patients’ needs are not only for medical treatment or cure, they’re also for relief and comfort, sincere attitude and sympathy, and for compassion of doctors and medical staff to listen to their mental as well as physical suffering.”  Dr. Shibagaki continued, “Medical schools tend to teach only skills and knowledge, but not professional or affective attitude or mindfulness.”

What is mindfulness and how does mindfulness relate to practicing internal medicine?

Mindfulness can be defined as the psychological process of bringing one’s attention to experiences occurring in the present moment.  It is a heightened sense of awareness of what is really happening.  In our field, internal medicine, mindfulness is appreciating that a patient is sad or angry or confused – and doing something about these emotions, even if it is merely providing an empathetic comment.  It is appreciating that a patient’s clinical situation is determined by their environment, their relationships, and their lived experiences – and then factoring those social determinants into the treatment plan.  It is also the doctor recognizing within him or herself that, at least at that moment, the stress may be too intense, or the workload too great – and then taking steps to improve those unfavorable conditions.

I also appreciated the message of the program was intended to move us forward, not backward.  This was clear from the subtitle:  “Beyond Evidence and Technology,” calling attention to the word “beyond.”  Mindfulness does not take us back, it moves us forward to a different level – I would say a higher level – of clinical expertise as internists.

The 2018 ACP Japan Chapter meeting was enormously successful, which is not at all surprising given the outstanding commitment and energy of the Chapter’s leadership, members and staff.  The program demonstrated just how enriching medical practice can be, particularly when that practice goes beyond evidence and technology.  I am grateful to have been part of the meeting.

Why not pursue a global career path?

Why not pursue a global career path?

The International Exchange Program Committee

On the first day of ACP Japan Chapter annual meeting 2018 in Kyoto, the International Exchange Program Committee (IEPC) held a panel discussion-style luncheon seminar entitled “Why not pursue a global career path?” Although it was a nice and sunny Saturday noon, ideal weather for outing with friends or families, the venue was packed and filled with the energies of the audience. Most of them were seemingly clinical residents or medical students, but some senior clinicians were also attended. After introducing themselves and their career path briefly, five speakers told their story on why they recommend a global career path.

Dr. Yamada

First speaker was Dr. Yamada, who is currently serving for his clinical residency in New York. He explains the difference in educational system for clinical residents between Japan and the United States. Dr. Yamada also mentioned how exciting it is to work with people with various backgrounds in the world’s most vibrant city, also known as a melting pot of races.

Dr. Ohara and Dr. Kinjo

The second speaker was Dr. Mamiko Ohara from Kameda Medical Hospital. As reflecting back the days she was struggling to survive as a researcher from Japan among many talented scientists at a top-ranked research institution in the United States, she introduced the “Planned happened theory” by John D. Krumbolts. According to the theory, there are five things to keep in mind to make your dream come true; those are curiosity, persistency, flexibility, optimism, and risk taking. Dr. Ohara closed her remarks by quoting the following phrase, “You can accomplish more than eighty percent of what you cannot achieve with your earnest effort.” Next speaker was Dr. Mitsuyo Kinjo from Okinawa chubu Hospital. As a mother of three children, she told her experience on pregnancy, childbirth, and raising children while working as a clinical fellow at a hospital in New York. In addition, she stated that earning a master degree of public health during her stay in New York was a significant event not just because it was awesome to study at an academic graduate school abroad with people from many countries, but because the network she created at the school has been affecting her career since then. Dr. Yuko Takeda, from Juntendo University, took over the talk. Dr. Takeda, who spent about a half of her career abroad, focused her story on adult learning. She emphasized that studying abroad is not a privilege limited to young people because adult people can learn effectively about problems they face and they have experience that would be precious resource for them. Dr. Takeda also suggested that studying abroad with a child/children would definitely add more value than staying alone, in that you can encounter unique experience in parenting in foreign countries. The last speaker was Dr. Tsutsumi from Takatsuki Hospital. He provided detailed information on how to succeed in matching clinical residency programs in the United States based on his experience as a mentor for four Japanese young physicians, all of them are currently working as a clinical resident or a fellow in the United States. “All too often, they rush to apply to the programs as soon as they are eligible to apply and ended up failing. They have no clear strategy to success. I’ve been seeing so many cases like that.” He ended his speech by stating that getting into the United States residency program is still possible, and that potential applicants need to have a well-crafted strategy as well as passion.

In the discussion, one attendee asked panelists about their way to improve English speaking ability. Some panelists introduced their tips, and they all agreed that there is no end to learning English and that we do not need to pay too much attention to speak “correct” English. There was also a discussion on the scope of “global career path”. Dr. Takeda indicated, “Some people from foreign countries who are now living in Japan are in desperate need of medical care. Providing medical care to them or doing what we can do for them is another way to pursue a global career path.

At the end of the session, Dr. Kiyoshi Kurokawa, the founding Governor of ACP Japan Chapter, gave us a message that it is vitally important for all of us to see and feel the world outside Japan whenever we can, in order to lead a fulfilling career path in this ever changing world.

We hope that this seminar has provided each participant some insight into a globally oriented career path and would help them pursue it.

Acknowledgement: We really appreciate Dr. Yuko Takeda for her participation as a panelist and also for her thoughtful talk. We are also grateful to Dr. Kiyoshi Kurokawa and Dr. Shotai Kobayashi, the former Governor, for their attendance and their fabulous comments.

 

 

 

 

Public Relations Committee welcomes new members!

New members joining on upcoming fiscal year!

Hi all,

I am very pleased to announce that our team is growing. Upcoming fiscal year, following four members will be joining us. Please join me in welcoming our new team members!

Best regards,

PRC chair Yasuo Oshima MD PhD FACP

Public Relations Committee
Member

Kiyoshi Shikino MD, PhD

Institution
 
Chiba University Hospital
Department/Division
 
General Medicine
Job Title
 
Project Assistant Professor
Message
 
Where there's a will, there's a way.
1
Public Relations Committee
Member

Mao Otake MD

Institution
 
Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital
Job Title
 
Resident
Message
 
We fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal. (Corinthians 4:18)
1
Public Relations Committee
Member

Kazuhiro Yasuo MD, FACP

Institution
 
Sapporo Higashi Tokushukai Hospital
Department/Division
 
General Internal Medicine
Job Title
 
Director
Message
 
Be ambicious.
Public Relations Committee
Member

Tomokiyo Yamamoto MD

Institution
 
Aizawa Hospital
Department/Division
 
General Internal Medicine
Job Title
 
Chief
Message
 
Rome was not bulit in a day

Report from HPPC/CMC committee.

The road to an FACP – Why and how do we aim for it? –

(Health and Public Policy Committee,Credential/Membership Committee joint project)

Yuhta Oyama, MD, FJSIM, FACP

Nihonkai General Hospital

Department of Internal Medicine

Division of Nephrology and Rheumatology

 On the second day of ACP Japan Chapter Annual Meeting 2018, the morning of June 3, we held a session with the above title as a joint project between HPPC and CMC. Although there are 320 FACPs and 6 MACPs as of July 1, 2017 in the ACP Japan Chapter, it was because we had the intention to have more member become FACP by listening to answers to questions “ Why did they aim for Fellow? ”, “ What kind of difference can be seen in daily work by becoming Fellow? “, and “How do they want to act in the future? “

 At the time of planning and submission, CMC was also planning a session to announce the procedure of Fellow application. Since the planning direction is the same, we decided to collaborate.

In the session, after opening remarks, we project the Convocation video which was held at ACP annual meeting (Internal Medicine). Prior to this project, we conducted a preliminary questionnaire using acp-exchange mailing list etc. Fellows and Masters were asked to answer in a questionnaire about the aim for Fellow and the change after becoming Fellow, and members were asked to answer in a questionnaire about the image of Fellow, whether they are aiming for Fellow, and whether they think that they would change themselves by becoming Fellow. So, after Convocation video presentation, we announced the results of the questionnaire and conducted a discussion based on the answer contents.

This time, Dr. Fumiaki Ueno (Governor, ACP Japan Chapter) and Dr. Kenji Maeda (Governor-Elect, ACP Japan Chapter) fortunately participated as a commentator. For that reason, clear focus was placed on this project, and a more meaningful message was conveyed to both the participants and the committee members as well (Dr. Ueno and Dr. Maeda, we thank you for taking the time to attend this session despite being busy during annual meeting). Although the motivation when respondents became Member or Fellow was various, we got impression that spiritual incentives such as pride, self-confidence, sense of responsibility, and so on, are given mental motivation to continue the occupation of a doctor by becoming Fellow.

After the discussion, there was a comment on the steps to apply for Fellow, and the session was summarized. Since the application procedure was explained in an easy-to-understand manner, for the participants, the method of acquiring Fellow became even clearer. Thank you very much for all the participants who had listened diligently.

We hope that more people aim for Fellow with this project as opportunity, but eventually, the two committees hope that number of members of ACP Japan Chapter will increase by repeating such a project.

Welcome Five New Chairs

Dear Colleagues,

 

The activity of Japan Chapter is supported by voluntary work of committee members.  As of 30 June, the chairs of 5 among 11 committees will accomplish their terms.  I want to thank all outgoing chairs for their contribution. At the same time, I would like to welcome five new chairs.

 

Fumiaki Ueno, MD, MACP

Governor for ACP Japan Chapter

 

New Chairs:

Scientific Program Committee

Sugihiro Hamaguchi MD, PhD, ACP member

Chair
Institution
 
Fukushima Medical University
Department/Division
 
Department of General Internal Medicine
Job Title
 
Professor
Message
 
People don't buy what you do; they buy why you do it.
Local Nominations Committee

Masao Nagayama MD, PhD, FACP, FAAN, FNCS

Chair
Institution
 
International University of Health and Welfare Graduate School of Medicine
Department/Division
 
Department of Neurology
Job Title
 
Professor
Message
 
Never give up !
Resident Fellow Committee

Yoshito Nishimura MD, ACP member

Chair
Institution
 
Okayama University Hospital
Department/Division
 
General Medicine
Job Title
 
Clinical Fellow
Message
 
Respect, trust, and work with empathy and passion in mind.
International Exchange Program Committee

Tetsuya Makiishi MD, FACP, FASN

Chair
Institution
 
Saiseikai Shiga Hospital
Department/Division
 
Division of Nephrology and Dialysis
Job Title
 
Chief
Message
 
Think big, start small, move fast!
Credentials/Membership Committee

Koichiro Yuji MD, PhD, FACP

Chair
Institution
 
The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo
Department/Division
 
Project Division of International Advanced Medical Research
Job Title
 
Project Associate Professor
Message
 
The Singularity Is Near

 

Chapter Business Report 2017-2018: ECPC

Early Career Physicians Committee

Chair: Akihito Kawashima, MD

Report:

  • At the ACP Japan Chapter Annual Meeting 2018, we held a lecture session on “how to train speaking skills in English” for young doctors and medical students who have difficulty speaking out at international conferences because of language barriers.
  • To facilitate active discussions inside our committee, we made a SNS group account for the members.

Plan:

  • This fall we’re planning to hold a spin-off workshop of the lecture session in the Annual Meetig 2018 in the Kanto area. This time, the focus will be on “how to read medical English efficiently”.
  • We’re also interested in advancement of technology in medicine. We’re now discussing ideas about holding an event featuring deep learning and application of AIs to medicine.

Overcoming the Challenge to the World ! Dr’s Dilemma, ACP Internal Medicine 2018

 

Overcoming the Challenge to the World !
Dr’s Dilemma, ACP Internal Medicine 2018

Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Hospital
Chair, Resident-Fellow Committee, American College of Physician Japan Chapter

Yoshito Nishimura M.D.

 I departed from Japan to New Orleans with determination to fight against the United States teams in the Dr’s Dilemma National Competition in ACP Internal Medicine Meeting 2018. Dr’s Dilemma is a competition to test the medical knowledge of around 50 teams, each representing each ACP chapters around the World. I participated in the competition with doctors from Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital, the champion team in the 2017 ACP Japan Chapter Dr’s Dilemma Competition. In the elimination round, we fought against 4 teams including the state of Washington and Massachusetts. Quizzes were first read loud by the speaker, and the scripts were shown up on the screen afterward. Although we could reach the final question, we could not go through to the semi-final round. We ended up being the 4th, taking out the Massachusetts team. Not only I could compete in the great competition, the conference itself also gave me opportunities to expand the wave of exchange with physicians around the world, making the experience was an one chance in a million, I deeply appreciate everyone in the ACP Japan Chapter and Okayama University Hospital, Department of General Medicine, for substantial support. Finally, I would like to thank ACP Japan Chapter for supporting us with travel grants.

Dr’s Dilemma Japan Chapter Members

Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital, Department of Medicine

Hayato Mitaka M.D.

Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital, Department of Medicine

Tomohiro Matsumoto M.D.

Okayama University Hospital, Department of General Medicine

Yoshito Nishimura M.D.

The 3rd Resident-Fellow Committee Seminar “Setting Out for the World Ahead!”

 

The 3rd Resident-Fellow Committee Seminar “Setting Out for the World Ahead!”

Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Hospital
Chair, Resident-Fellow Committee, American College of Physician Japan Chapter

Yoshito Nishimura M.D.

 We are glad to report that we have successfully finished the 3rd RFC seminar with a slogan “Setting Out for the World Ahead!” on April 15, 2018. In the seminar, we set up 2 venues: Room A for ones who want to acquire the most important skills related to internal medicine in daily clinical encounters, and Room B to for young doctors interested in the evidence-based medical educational skills. Despite April, the busy first month of the fiscal year, there were 62 participants total. In the room A, we have invited 2 significant guest speakers; Dr. Yuka Kitano from the St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Yokohama City Seibu Hospital, and Dr. Sou Sakamoto from the Juntendo University, Nerima Hospital. In a 90-minute session each, Dr. Kitano held the session “Practical 5-min Teaching Skills for Clinicians”, for which she even has a blog. Dr. Sakamoto gave an interactive lecture “Approach for Patients with Altered Mental Status”. All the 43 participants in the Room A seemed to be immersed in the world of those leaders, with serious yet amused looks on their faces. Dr. Tadayuki Hashimoto from Hashimoto City Hospital gave us a workshop with a motto “Residents as Teachers”. It was done in a completely bidirectional style with a lot of group works. Almost all the participants gave back us good feedbacks after all. In the 63 participants, 40 of them were ACP non-members, and 7 of whom enrolled onsite! We are looking forward to continuing the seminar, anticipating broader yet more solid committee management.